Gender Equity https://socalgrantmakers.org/ en Five Opportunities for Philanthropy to Protect and Expand Abortion Access in a Post-Roe v Wade World https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/post-roe-v-wade-world <span>Five Opportunities for Philanthropy to Protect and Expand Abortion Access in a Post-Roe v Wade World</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/28/2022 - 16:17</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-06-28T08:20:55Z">Tue, 06/28/2022 - 08:20</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">In a 6-3 vote, the Supreme Court of the United States’ ruling on Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization struck down both Roe v. Wade (1973) and Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1992). This landmark decision eliminated a person’s constitutional right to abortion and reversed 50 years of federal abortion protection. It also sets the stage to roll back other rulings, including Griswold v. Connecticut, in which the Supreme Court said married couples have the right to obtain contraceptives; Lawrence v. Texas, which established the right to engage in private sexual acts; and Obergefell v. Hodges, which defends the right to same-sex marriage.</p> <p>Destroying the protection of Roe v. Wade threatens our progress toward racial equity while reinforcing systemic racism and white supremacy in the United States. People with resources and power will always be able to access abortion and other health care services. The lack of federal protection of the right to an abortion disproportionately impacts Black and Brown women, the transgender community, and non-binary people. The Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson will make it harder or impossible for people who have been historically oppressed and those living in poverty to retain bodily autonomy and receive medically necessary and potentially life-saving procedures.</p> <p>The Dobbs v. Jackson ruling destabilizes the protections offered by the 14th Amendment’s due process and equal protection clauses, which have been pivotal in securing a range of rights and protections for LGBTQ+ folks, women, and people of color. For many, the 14th Amendment was the constitutional amendment that <a href="https://19thnews.org/2022/05/lgbtq-civil-rights-roe-supreme-court/">countered the anti-Black and anti-woman nature of the Constitution</a>. If more rulings are undone under the guise of only honoring rights that are “deeply rooted” in our “nation’s history and tradition,” the question becomes, who is afforded rights under this interpretation of the Constitution? Who is being actively excluded?</p> <p class="intro">Regardless of whether a funder is health-focused or not, SoCal Grantmakers and Northern California Grantmakers believe our philanthropic community has an opportunity and responsibility to protect the well-being of women and gender expansive folks, especially Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and people of color. Five opportunities present themselves for immediate action.</p> <h2>Fund abortion clinics and reproductive justice</h2> <p>As Bia Vieira noted, philanthropy has the opportunity to <a href="https://womensfoundca.org/reproductive-justice-rapid-grants/">“be bold enough to fund what is immediately ahead of us and invest in the long-term work of change-making.”</a> The Women’s Foundation California has been pushing rapid response dollars to reproductive justice partners. The Liberty Hill Foundation has compiled a <a href="https://www.libertyhill.org/news/reports/reproductive-justice-docket/">Reproductive Justice Docket</a> to help guide funds and support toward organizations doing this work on the ground. <a href="https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Lnp4YegBRGLc8ZrAhWoq5mMPUFI8fqpuyS9IQ_4Pm6I/edit">The Libra Foundation shares cross-cutting partners</a> who work at the forefront of the reproductive justice movement.&lt;</p> <p>Additionally, the legal right to an abortion does not necessarily mean it’s accessible for all; payment for the service, child care coverage, time off from work, access to transportation, and a means of emotional support, among other elements, are crucial for those seeking treatment. And now, with the only option for legal and safe reproductive care being travel across state lines, all of these needs are amplified. <a href="https://www.guttmacher.org/article/2022/05/heres-how-philanthropy-can-protect-access-abortion-post-roe-v-wade-world">Visit the Guttmacher Institute’s guide</a> on how philanthropy can protect access to abortion by supporting abortion funds and grassroots organizations and investing in abortion-services infrastructure.</p> <h2>Expand and ensure abortion access in midterms elections</h2> <p>Though the 1973 decision established a constitutionally protected right to abortion, it never guaranteed access. Efforts to codify Roe have yet to be successful, but ensuring voter engagement in the midterm elections could lead to the reintroduction of more legislation doing just that. And, as the Supreme Court Justices potentially move to undo more precedents, we will need to <a href="https://www.haasjr.org/resources/supporting-democracy-dollars-is-a-powerful-way-funders-can-protect-local-elections">elect a congressional body</a> willing to codify the rights LGBTQ+, women, and people of color have secured at the federal level.</p> <p>Investments in civic engagement organizing and mobilization, primarily to support historically disenfranchised communities in getting to the polls, can raise the diversity of groups getting a say in our country’s leadership. Here in California, we hit a <a href="https://calmatters.org/newsletters/whatmatters/2022/06/california-primary-2022-turnout/">record low</a> for primary elections for many reasons, including <a href="https://calmatters.org/commentary/my-turn/2020/07/voter-suppression-is-a-california-problem-too/">voter suppression</a>. Protecting and expanding access to abortion will require us to continue the fight for fair elections.</p> <h2>Reframe abortion beyond the gender binary</h2> <p>Dominant narratives tend to associate abortion solely with women when the implications of overturning Roe v. Wade for transgender, gender-non-conforming, and non-binary people are devastating. <a href="https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2022/03/transgender-people-get-pregnant-sometimes-trans-people-need-abortions/">As Translash founder Imara Jones noted</a>, the narratives against abortion access and trans rights are increasingly one and the same. Ensuring the narrative includes all those who have the ability to get pregnant is not only factual, it includes the experiences of all those seeking abortion care.</p> <p>It’s also crucial not to lose sight of reproductive justice — <a href="https://www.sistersong.net/reproductive-justice">a movement led by Indigenous women, women of color, and trans people</a>. California Coalition for Reproductive Freedom, California Latinas for Reproductive Justice, Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights, and the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health all define reproductive justice as an effort to <a href="https://forwardtogether.org/tools/media-guide-abortion-latinx-community/">“ensure all people having the social, political, and economic power and resources to make healthy decisions about their gender, bodies, sexuality, and families for themselves and their communities.”</a></p> <p>As philanthropy engages in internal and external dialogue about abortion and reproductive justice at large, we can name abortion concretely in the context of Roe v. Wade, our community must use gender-inclusive language and shift the narratives on reproductive justice toward securing bodily autonomy for all people.</p> <h2>Recognize far-reaching &amp; acute implications, especially for people of color</h2> <p>Many funders might not consider themselves gender justice or health funders or even think this decision impacts their scope of work. However, in reality, the implications of Roe v. Wade are numerous — the <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2022/06/24/economy/economic-impact-roe-wade-overturn/index.html">economic impacts</a> will be considerable, and this decision will cut across every sector from education to climate to infrastructure. Data shows that states with the most restrictive abortion laws have the <a href="https://www.commonwealthfund.org/blog/2022/public-health-paradox-states-abortion-laws-maternal-child-health-outcomes">“weakest maternal and child health outcomes, and are least likely to invest in at-risk populations.”</a> The vast majority of these restrictive states <a href="https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/23057032/supreme-court-abortion-rights-roe-v-wade-state-aid">“rank in the bottom half of states in the comprehensive support they provide to children and their families,”</a> resulting in more children living in poverty and struggling to keep up with early <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/00031224211069975?journalCode=asra&amp;#:~:text=children%20and%20families.-,We%20find%20that%20more%20generous%20public%20spending%20for%20children%20and,on%20developmental%20items%20are%20lower.">childhood development milestones.</a></p> <p>Moreover, this decision will also disproportionately impact Black and Brown communities. The adverse outcomes of being forced to continue an unintended dangerous pregnancy affect people of color and those living in poverty at exponentially higher rates. Black, American Indian, and Alaska Native individuals are twice as likely to die from <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2019/p0905-racial-ethnic-disparities-pregnancy-deaths.html">pregnancy-related causes</a> than white women. <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CfMTFcDuHS0/?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=">And as the Movement for Black Lives articulates,</a> “Black women, girls, transgender, and gender non-conforming people have been subjected to a long history of reproductive control rooted in the brutal legacy of enslavement, and denying access to safe, legal abortion services is a continuation of that troubling history.” Additionally, they note that the continued effort to limit legal access to abortions will likely lead to an “expansion of the carceral state…[which] has always been biased against Black people.”</p> <p>In response to the intersectionality of abortion access, The Libra Foundation invites philanthropy to think more comprehensively about the variety of issue areas they support and recognize the interconnected nature of the systems of oppression we face. </p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span>Support California in becoming an abortion sanctuary </span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p>On Friday, June 24th, Governor Newsom signed <a href="https://www.gov.ca.gov/2022/06/24/in-response-to-supreme-court-decision-governor-newsom-signs-legislation-to-protect-women-and-providers-in-california-from-abortion-bans-by-other-states/">AB 1666 by Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan (D-Orinda)</a>, protecting people in California from civil liability for providing, aiding, or receiving abortion care in the state. This legislation is a response to the efforts of states looking to extend their anti-abortion laws, especially regarding prosecuting patients and doctors seeking reproductive healthcare. Moreover, California has joined a <a href="https://www.gov.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/Multi-State-Commitment-to-Reproductive-Freedom_Final-1.pdf">Multi-State Commitment to Reproductive Freedom</a> alongside Oregon and Washington to ensure that the West Coast remains a “safe haven” for people seeking reproductive healthcare, including abortions and contraceptives, and extends the patient and provider protection in all three states. This legislation follows a series of actions California has already taken for reproductive healthcare, including Governor Newsom’s proposed <a href="https://www.gov.ca.gov/2022/05/11/governor-newsom-proposes-reproductive-health-package-to-strengthen-protections-expand-access-and-welcome-businesses-from-anti-abortion-states/">$125 million Reproductive Health Package</a> to help the state prepare for the wave of people from other states seeking reproductive health care and l<a href="https://www.gov.ca.gov/2022/03/22/governor-newsom-signs-legislation-to-eliminate-out-of-pocket-costs-for-abortion-services/">egislation eliminating out-of-pocket costs for abortion services</a>. </p> <p>While California continues to strengthen its commitment to reproductive healthcare and expand access to safe and legal abortions for all people seeking care, there is still more legislation the state can pass to prepare. Last fall, Governor Newsom convened the <a href="https://www.cafabcouncil.org/">Future of Abortion Council</a>, a coalition of reproductive rights, health, and justice groups, which proposed a set of policy recommendations to transform California into a “sanctuary for abortion.” The critical legislation suggested by the council and currently moving in the legislature include*: </p> <ul><li><a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220SB1142">SB 1142 Abortion services</a>: This legislation would create a state-administered fund to assist patients who face financial barriers to obtaining an abortion and support public research into improving abortion access.</li> <li><a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB2134">AB 2134 Reproductive health care:</a> This bill would set aside money for clinics that provide uncompensated care to low-income patients whose insurance does not cover abortion and contraceptive services.</li> <li><a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB2091">AB 2091 Disclosure of information</a>: Aims to prohibit medical providers and health insurers from sharing information in cases that seek to penalize abortion.</li> <li><a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB2626">AB 2626 Medical Board of California</a>: Seeks to prevent the state medical board from suspending or revoking the license of a physician punished in another state for performing an abortion following California law.</li> <li><a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB1918">AB 1918 California Reproductive Health Service Corps</a>: Aims to form a “reproductive health service corps” for underserved parts of the state.</li> <li><a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220SB1375">SB 1375 Nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives</a>: abortion and practice standards: This legislation would allow trained nurse practitioners and midwives to perform first-trimester abortions without supervision from a physician. This bill would dramatically increase access to abortion by allowing more health care professionals to provide the procedure.</li> <li><a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220SCA10">SCA-10 Reproductive freedom</a>: A bill that “...would amend the California Constitution to prohibit the state from denying or interfering with an individual’s reproductive freedom in their most intimate decisions, which includes their fundamental right to choose to have an abortion and their fundamental right to choose or refuse contraceptives.” Senator Toni G. Atkins introduced this measure (D-San Diego) which is moving through the legislature and will likely appear on the ballot in California’s midterm elections. </li> </ul><p>You can read a detailed breakdown of the legislation above, other policy recommendations, and how California is preparing to be a haven <a href="https://calmatters.org/politics/2022/04/california-abortion-rights/">in Cal Matters’ recent article</a>. <br />  </p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/47" hreflang="en">News</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/324" hreflang="en">Equity &amp; Racial Justice</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/377" hreflang="en">Gender Equity</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/72" hreflang="en">Health &amp; Wellness</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-geo-location-taxonomy"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-pin margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg aria-hidden="true" focusable="false" data-prefix="fas" data-icon="map-marker-alt" class="svg-inline--fa fa-map-marker-alt fa-w-12" role="img" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 384 512"><path fill="currentColor" d="M172.268 501.67C26.97 291.031 0 269.413 0 192 0 85.961 85.961 0 192 0s192 85.961 192 192c0 77.413-26.97 99.031-172.268 309.67-9.535 13.774-29.93 13.773-39.464 0zM192 272c44.183 0 80-35.817 80-80s-35.817-80-80-80-80 35.817-80 80 35.817 80 80 80z"></path></svg> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 28 Jun 2022 23:17:42 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1423 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Healing Justice https://socalgrantmakers.org/resources/healing-justice <span>Healing Justice</span> <span><span>Crystal Starr</span></span> <span>Mon, 12/12/2022 - 14:33</span> <div class="field__item hyphenate link-styles black"><a href="/media/427" hreflang="en">Healing Justice Exhibit.pdf</a></div> Mon, 12 Dec 2022 22:33:24 +0000 Crystal Starr 1761 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Black Women for Wellness: A Case for Supporting Black-led Reproductive Justice https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/black-women-wellness-case-supporting-black-led-reproductive-justice <span>Black Women for Wellness: A Case for Supporting Black-led Reproductive Justice</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Tue, 09/27/2022 - 17:17</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-image"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field__label visually-hidden">Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2022-09/Abortion%20Will%20Remain%20Legal.png?itok=mTr20FTa" width="480" height="165" alt="Text Image Stating: Abortion is and Will Remain Legal in California. We Got You!&quot;" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-09-29T17:19:43Z">Thu, 09/29/2022 - 17:19</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro"><span><span><span><span><span><span>Popping up near bus stops, train stations, and other strategically placed locations within a driver’s line of vision are giant billboards in crisp black and white, proclaiming: </span></span><em><span>Abortion is and will remain legal in California. </span></em><span>O<span>verlaid on the message in a puffy, golden font reads a closing reassurance: </span></span><em><span>We got you!</span></em></span></span></span></span><span> </span></p> <p class="intro"><span><span><span><span><span><span>The organizing and creation of this public awareness campaign are a direct reflection of the strength, wisdom, and brilliance embodied in the leadership and lived experience of Black women. Launched by </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://bwwla.org"><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Black Women for Wellness</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> and the </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://blackrj.org"><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>National Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>, these billboards across California set the record straight and offer much-needed encouragement today. As in so many other circumstances, Black women and gender-expansive organizers shine their light, offer their vision, and show us all a way forward. They also provide a path for philanthropy to follow at this moment. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span>Getting Philanthropy to We Got You</span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>It’s long past time for </span>philanthropy to take a “we got you” stance regarding Black women’s leadership on reproductive justice.<span> </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>To set the context, a meager </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://philanthropy.iupui.edu/news-events/news-item/giving-to-women%E2%80%99s-and-girls%E2%80%99-organizations-represents-1.9-percent-of-total-charitable-giving-in-the-u.s..html?id=373"><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>1.9% of all philanthropic dollars go to women and girls</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></a>. Moreover, o<span><span><span><span><span><span>nly a fraction of that goes to reproductive justice, with a tinier slice of that going to Black-led organizations. And yet, Black-led organizations are at the forefront of California’s push to become a reproductive freedom state. Despite chronic underfunding, organizations like the LA-based Black Women for Wellness are making a way out of no way. Their leadership and vision demonstrate how and why it’s possible for the proclamations of the billboards to ring true. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <blockquote> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Black women are at the forefront of the intersectional reproductive justice movement and helm its thought leadership, moving our state forward on issues that matter to everyone. </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Listening to and taking the lead from Black women, femmes, girls, and gender-expansive folks is vital to how California fortifies itself as a bastion of reproductive justice organizing.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </blockquote> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Over five years ago, Black Women for Wellness co-sponsored a groundbreaking bill that mandated companies to inform the public of what’s in the products we put on our bodies every day. Two years ago, they were behind a bill that required implicit bias training for healthcare providers to address disparities in Black maternal health. And just last year, they pushed the </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://womensfoundca.org/feminist-laws-signed-in-ca/"><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Momnibus bill</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> to the finish line, which re-imagines maternal health for birthing people and new parents. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Black Women for Wellness has a multigenerational lineage of organizing that has shaped California’s policy landscape on issues ranging from making doulas available to birthing folks to rolling back eugenics-based Welfare policies. Black women are at the forefront of the intersectional reproductive justice movement and helm its thought leadership, moving our state forward on issues that matter to everyone. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Listening to and taking the lead from Black women, femmes, girls, and gender-expansive folks is vital to how California fortifies itself as a bastion of reproductive justice organizing. But that trailblazing has not translated into dollars in the field. Even without the material resources, Black women create solutions to better their environment and communities, practice effective leadership, and foster a sense of safety and belonging.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>While there is more cultural recognition that Black women have always been central to the struggle for freedom and equality, it’s time to turn that recognition into real dollars.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span>Beyond Abortion: An Intersectional Approach </span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>As writer, radical feminist, and visionary Audre Lorde reminds us:</span></span><em><span> “There is no such thing as a single issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives</span></em><span><span>.</span></span><em><span>” </span></em><span><span>Black Women for Wellness has baked that political approach into their work and California’s reproductive justice movement writ large. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Black Women for Wellness does not have a myopic focus on abortion, which strengthens their organizing power. The organization looks at the big picture and connects the dots. They are making it clear to folks that an attack on abortion access is inextricably linked to other crucial questions: <em>Who gets to have a say in who you love? How do your gender and expression impact the kind of care you receive at the hospital? What happens when you’re stopped for a traffic violation? When you get ready to cast your ballot? </em></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span>Building the Field of (c)4 Funders</span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Policy advocacy is a highly impactful way to advance equity and justice, and philanthropy can play an essential role in that process. It’s high time for the sector to grow its advocacy role and allow the resources to flow. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Like many power-building organizations, Black Women for Wellness has a 501(c)4 arm — the first in the country focusing on Black women’s Reproductive Justice. Philanthropic c4 grantmaking is often insufficient as it moves too late and only in election years. If funders want to sustain long-term organizing work around abortion access, they must fund all the other </span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>non-partisan elements of 501(c)4 organizations. Some examples include providing funding to hire more staff, participating in learning opportunities with peers, combating voting suppression, advancing key legislation, and furthering their community reach. Foundation grants to 501(c)4 groups have the potential to free up organizations’ capacity to use their unrestricted funds for more advocacy work (like critical work around this November’s Proposition 1). It isn’t about political parties — it’s about making the political process more accessible.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Women’s Foundation California’s </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://womensfoundca.org/what-we-do/training/funders-policy-institute/"><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Funders Policy Institute </span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>(FPI) is one way to nurture that growth. An immersive learning program, FPI is focused on supporting donors and philanthropists to become more strategic in their policy advocacy grantmaking. The weeklong training takes an intersectional feminist approach to policy advocacy and power-building for racial, economic, and gender justice in California. For those interested in growing their policy chops and connecting with aligned funders, </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://womensfoundca.org/what-we-do/training/funders-policy-institute/"><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>registration is now open</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> to join this year’s FPI class.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span>Many Pathways to Liberation</span></span></span></span></span></h2> <blockquote> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>It’s time for philanthropy to take a “we got you” stance regarding moving money and prioritize a trust-based approach. We have a role in strengthening California’s infrastructure as a reproductive freedom state for all, ensuring affordable access to all reproductive health care options. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </blockquote> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Black Women for Wellness is a Black-led reproductive justice organization working swiftly and diligently to protect the political, economic, and fundamental rights of Black women and girls. There are many ways to support them and organizations like them, regardless of whether or not you are a reproductive justice funder. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>There are so many avenues to enter this work. Through the rich and complex lives of Black women, the nonprofit has trained Black women and girls in California to influence public policy, organize, and build power. <em>Building on a COVID-19 recovery? We got you! Providing real deal comprehensive sex education? We got you! Making sure your shampoo doesn’t give you cancer? We got you! Bringing in voter education and civic engagement? We got you!</em></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span>Our Work for Wellness</span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Black Women for Wellness is doing what needs to be done and doing it well. They have taken an approach that blends culture shift with liberatory policy change and direct electoral work. They elevate the critical challenges that Black women face and build real political and community power. Imagine what might be possible if we funded them at the scale their work deserves.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Now, we — the philanthropic sector of California — have work to do. It’s time for philanthropy to take a “we got you” stance regarding moving money and prioritize a trust-based approach. We have a role in strengthening California’s infrastructure as a reproductive freedom state for all, ensuring affordable access to all reproductive health care options. The power and potential of organizations like Black Women for Wellness deserve nothing less than </span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://womensfoundca.org/multi-year-grantmaking-2022/"><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>multi-year</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span>, unrestricted funding and a lot of it to keep this work moving forward now and for generations to come. And that funding needs to be easy to access with simplified grant applications and reporting processes.<em> Do you genuinely have someone’s back if you make them fill out endless short-paragraph essays in an outdated grant portal? </em></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>There is too much at stake and substantial evidence that clearly shows what’s possible when organizations led by Black women and gender-expansive folks get the funding and trust they deserve. Black women and gender-expansive folks deliver. It’s time for philanthropy to do the same. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Below, you’ll find three ways you can take action today to support organizations, networks, and infrastructure building bodily autonomy in California and beyond. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ol><li> <p><a href="https://womensfoundca.org/reproductive-justice-rapid-grants/"><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Give Now</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span> </span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span> Donate to Women’s Foundation California or directly to any (or all!) of the phenomenal BIPOC-led reproductive justice organizations.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://womensfoundca.org/multi-year-grantmaking-2022/"><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Give for the Long Haul</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span> </span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The philanthropic reality is most BIPOC-led organizations like those that are part of our grant partner community are not funded over the long haul. Join us in supporting movement leaders with multi-year general operating support.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://womensfoundca.org/what-we-do/training/funders-policy-institute/"><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Join the Funders Policy Institute</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span> If you are a grantmaker, funder, or philanthropic advisor looking to learn more about how to fund the organizations and policy advocacy that are paving the pathway to liberation, come to the Funders Policy Institute, November 14-18.</span></span></span></span></span></span><span> </span><span> </span></p> </li> </ol></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">Staff Blog</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/377" hreflang="en">Gender Equity</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/72" hreflang="en">Health &amp; Wellness</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-geo-location-taxonomy"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-pin margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg aria-hidden="true" focusable="false" data-prefix="fas" data-icon="map-marker-alt" class="svg-inline--fa fa-map-marker-alt fa-w-12" role="img" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 384 512"><path fill="currentColor" d="M172.268 501.67C26.97 291.031 0 269.413 0 192 0 85.961 85.961 0 192 0s192 85.961 192 192c0 77.413-26.97 99.031-172.268 309.67-9.535 13.774-29.93 13.773-39.464 0zM192 272c44.183 0 80-35.817 80-80s-35.817-80-80-80-80 35.817-80 80 35.817 80 80 80z"></path></svg> </p> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/post-roe-v-wade-world" hreflang="en">Five Opportunities for Philanthropy to Protect and Expand Abortion Access in a Post-Roe v Wade World</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/stories-abundance-how-womens-foundation-california-advancing-gender-justice-through-narrative" hreflang="en">&quot;Stories of Abundance&quot;: How Women’s Foundation California is Advancing Gender Justice Through Narrative Change</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/face-and-flow-finance-how-impact-investing-can-move-racial-and-gender-wealth-gap" hreflang="en">The Face and the Flow of Finance: How Impact Investing can Move the Racial and Gender Wealth Gap </a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 28 Sep 2022 00:17:33 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1629 at https://socalgrantmakers.org "Stories of Abundance": How Women’s Foundation California is Advancing Gender Justice Through Narrative Change https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/stories-abundance-how-womens-foundation-california-advancing-gender-justice-through-narrative <span>&quot;Stories of Abundance&quot;: How Women’s Foundation California is Advancing Gender Justice Through Narrative Change</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Wed, 07/07/2021 - 13:09</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2021-03-12T13:09:24Z">Fri, 03/12/2021 - 13:09</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p><a href="https://womensfoundca.org/who-we-are/about-womens-foundation/"><strong>Women’s Foundation California</strong></a> is a statewide, publicly supported foundation committed to realizing racial, economic, and gender justice. Recently, the Foundation has taken a strong interest in the emergent field of “culture change” to help advance its vision of justice by influencing and reimagining our nation’s most pervasive narratives and beliefs. For Women’s Foundation of California, investing in long-term culture change has become as critical as engaging in policy and advocacy work. </p> <p>“We recognized that policy and legislative action were not enough to erase the disadvantages that women, girls, transgender, and gender-nonconforming people – especially those from communities of color and low-income communities – face in our society,” stated <strong>Bia Vieira, Chief Strategist of Programs at the Women’s Foundation</strong>. “The reality is we need to change attitudes and build broad public support before and while we achieve legislative change, or we risk regressing and fighting an uphill battle.” </p> <p>The Foundation decided to establish the <a href="https://womensfoundca.org/what-we-do/grantmaking/california-gender-justice-funders-network/"><strong>California Gender Justice Funders Network</strong></a>, a collaboration with a diverse group of funders, including Blue Shield of California Foundation, Fondation CHANEL, and The California Endowment, to advance the national conversation on gender justice and liberation. The Network is the first collaborative focused on the intersection of culture change and gender justice and convened by Women’s Foundation and its state partner, <a href="https://www.philanthropyca.org/gender-justice"><strong>Philanthropy California</strong></a>. </p> <p>The Network’s first project was launching the <a href="https://womensfoundca.org/what-we-do/grantmaking/culture-change-fund/"><strong>Culture Change Fund</strong></a> – a $10 million initiative focused on using narrative power to change public perceptions on a broad range of gender justice issues, including racism, pay-equity, gender-based violence, maternal health, contraception, and broader reproductive justice and gender justice matters. The Fund also explores how funders can support grassroots organizations and movement leaders in employing culture as a tool to change the hearts and minds of communities. </p> <p>In March 2020, SCG connected with Bia Vieira to discuss the Culture Change Fund’s launch and their initial learnings from its research phase, Story at Scale. As the COVID outbreak took hold of the world, SCG paused the conversation to allow both organizations to focus on the pandemic response. This year, we reconnected with Bia to learn more about how the Culture Change Fund shifted its priorities in response to crises, the campaigns it supported during a critical election year, and why investing in long-term culture change continues to be necessary. </p> <h3 class="h3-alt">How would you define gender justice?</h3> <p>Gender justice is a framework used to bring about the fair and equitable treatment of people of all genders to achieve joy, justice, and dignity. To this day, Black and brown communities, transwomen, low-income women, and many other groups continue to experience unprecedented levels of criminalization, poverty, and other forms of systemic violence. We know that the pandemic has worsened many of the inequities those communities were already facing. Gender justice serves people directly impacted by gender-based oppression and ensures that they have access to the resources they need to live their lives to the fullest. </p> <h3 class="h3-alt">What inspired the California Gender Justice Network to create the Culture Change Fund? </h3> <p>The Culture Change Fund idea stemmed from the feedback our funders received from their partners, who noticed they were entirely focused on policy efforts and were missing strategies to connect with folks at the heart level. Community leaders asked funders to support civic engagement work <u><em>and</em></u> build their capacity to tell stories to change minds. After these conversations, the Gender Justice Network began exploring storytelling’s potential to bridge the people and the issues funders were trying to address. The Fund emerged from the Network asking, <em>What does it mean to do culture change work? How can we use it to enact enduring change? And how can we support our partners in doing that work?  </em></p> <h3 class="h3-alt">Why do you believe storytelling is an important tool for women, the LGBTQ+ community, and other folks from historically underrepresented backgrounds?</h3> <p>Stories humanize us. Getting to know someone's journey, where they came from, and what they’ve done is incredibly moving. However, the stories of trans and non-binary folks, poor communities, people of color, immigrants, and many others are not prevalent. When people’s experiences are not shared, it becomes easier to dehumanize and “other” them. Stories bring us together, and it becomes harder to ignore or erase a person when you feel a connection to them. Uplifting historically marginalized communities’ experiences helps bolster the cultural narrative that everyone deserves to access a fulfilling and just life.</p> <h3 class="h3-alt">The first stage of the Culture Change Fund was a research phase called Story at Scale. What did you learn in your preliminary research?</h3> <p>The Culture Change Fund began with a robust research phase called <a href="https://www.storyatscale.org/?page_id=1885"><strong>Story at Scale</strong></a>, a narrative research project to provide artists and advocates with data-driven insights to create campaigns and stories to advance their efforts. For about a year, we worked with the preeminent researchers on culture change and narrative change work, Liz Mann and Ricky Conway, to discover the tools and stories with the potential to resonate with people across the nation. Our researchers conducted a national survey with about 7,000 participants alongside a set of more in-depth interviews that asked questions regarding pay equity, gender identity, leadership, and other justice-related topics. We intentionally created an inclusive research process by actively including people with lived experiences, including queer people, communities of color, and folks from different financial realities. </p> <p>While our initial findings showed that many people care about gender justice and equity issues, it also revealed that many other folks still hold rigid and conventional beliefs about gender norms. Nevertheless, we were encouraged by a messaging test we ran with fourteen different videos. One of the videos that received the most traction was <strong><em>Ultraviolet</em></strong>, which featured a trans, non-binary individual reading a letter to their father. Regardless of your knowledge or familiarity with non-binary folks, the video got traction because it was fundamentally about a child writing a heartfelt message to their parent. While we still have to reckon with the contrasting ideologies and beliefs represented in our data, the traction Ultraviolet received made us hopeful that we can sway people through storytelling.  </p> <h3 class="h3-alt">What tools and strategies emerged from the Story at Scale research?</h3> <p>We need more than one person’s account, one headline, or one communication strategy to shift culture. We need to fill our cultural landscape with stories from folks who have been historically silenced, erased, and not represented. The Story at Scale research culminated with a new set of tools to help tell underrepresented communities’ stories and achieve culture change. The tools were the <a href="https://www.storyatscale.org/?page_id=1885"><strong>Story Platform</strong></a>, a core narrative to achieve gender justice, and the Story Pillars, a set of six “storytelling areas” to help artists and activists craft stories that can influence the public. We hope organizations use the Story Platform and Pillars to develop effective storytelling campaigns to reach critical audiences and further their organizing, advocacy, and narrative efforts. </p> <h3 class="h3-alt">How did the Culture Change Fund adapt its implementation phase in response to the crises of 2020?</h3> <p>We began implementing the completed Story at Scale research in March 2020 alongside <a href="https://iwillharness.com/"><strong>Harness</strong></a>, <a href="https://www.culturalpower.org/"><strong>The Center for Cultural Power</strong></a>, <a href="https://www.wearetheleague.org/"><strong>The League</strong></a>, and <a href="https://illuminatives.org/"><strong>IllumiNative</strong></a>. These four organizations are our anchor partners who have developed this project with us from the start. As the COVID pandemic intensified globally, we knew we needed to resource our anchor partners and the Fund’s other grantees more quickly and substantially. We awarded $2 million to help our grantees navigate the crises and pivot their storytelling campaigns. The pandemic forced all of us to lean into experimentation, rethink what was mandatory, and innovate whenever possible. We continued to virtually convene a community of practice with funders, activists, artists, and researchers to build a living library of resources and host learning lessons, half of which have focused on sharing and implementing the Story at Scale research. Additionally, we have continued the <a href="https://www.thebigwe.com/cs101"><strong>Culture Shift 101</strong></a> series to apply the tools of Cultural Strategy. </p> <h3 class="h3-alt">Can you share some of the campaigns and projects your partners launched in 2020?</h3> <ul><li> <p><strong>The Center for Cultural Power </strong>produced a beautiful gender justice coloring book titled, <strong><a href="https://backend.ccp.colab.coop/media/pdfs/AllBodiesDeserve_ColorBook.pdf"><em>All Bodies Deserve: Creating the Future of Us</em></a></strong> distributed in digital and physical formats. The Center invited various gender-expansive artists to contribute to the coloring book to capture and celebrate different genders, bodies, and expressions. </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Prism</strong> produced six gender justice stories by writers of color based on the Story Pillars. They also developed <a href="https://www.prismreports.org/series/sex-positivity-and-the-arts"><strong>Sex Positivity and the Arts</strong></a>, a series that explored “how sex-positivity embodies and intersects with liberation and self-determination.” </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>She The People</strong> produce​d ​a 6-part docuseries following founder, political strategist Aimee Allison and four community organizers on a mission to mobilize one million women of color across America to vote in 2020.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>IllumiNative</strong>, in collaboration with the Center for Native American Youth and the Native Organizers Alliance, launched <a href="http://indigenousfutures.illuminatives.org/"><strong>The Indigenous Futures Project (IFP</strong></a>) to “gather and disseminate critical information and strategies about the priorities and needs of Native communities in preparation for the 2020 election.”</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Culture Surge</strong> was a collaboration between all four of our anchor partners that served as an accelerator for building narrative power before the 2020 election. Cultural Surge connected a broad coalition of changemakers to advance critical narratives across issues and campaigns and maximize the cultural impact that could lead to change.</p> </li> </ul><h3 class="h3-alt"> </h3> <h3 class="h3-alt">Many of your partners launched campaigns focused on the 2020 election. Did the election and the insurrection on the Capitol prompt any reflections on the narratives currently taking hold of our culture?</h3> <p>The last administration fostered a powerful national narrative that activated and emboldened white supremacy. The administration told a segment of the population that this country belongs to them and that other groups are trying to take it away. This narrative lends itself to violence by stoking racial division; people become protective of their group and aggressive toward anyone who falls outside it. The “me first” and “me against the world” narrative is still present and growing. Advocates for racial justice and equity will need culture change to create cracks in this dangerous narrative, especially in 2022. There are many entry points — we can talk about community, shared values, our family, and our neighborhoods to craft compelling messages. It’s important to understand that culture change work is not an endpoint; it’s an ongoing, long-term strategy. </p> <h3 class="h3-alt">How can the SCG network support the efforts of the Gender Justice Network and the Culture Change Fund?</h3> <p>The intersection of culture change and gender justice is still a nascent field. There are many opportunities to create new initiatives together that advance and transform gender justice through cultural strategies. Grantmakers are always welcome to join the California Gender Justice Funders Network. We are also still looking for partners for the Culture Change Fund. We want to ensure that there’s longevity to culture change work and that it continues to be supported by a robust set of philanthropic and community-based partners. You can email Jane Lin,  <strong><a href="mailto:janel@womensfoundca.org">janel@womensfoundca.org</a></strong> at  Women's Foundation to learn more. Folks interested in learning more about our work can join our many upcoming <a href="https://womensfoundca.org/what-we-do/grantmaking/culture-change-fund/"><strong>community learning opportunities</strong></a>. </p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/49" hreflang="en">Strategy Spotlight</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/377" hreflang="en">Gender Equity</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-geo-location-taxonomy"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-pin margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg aria-hidden="true" focusable="false" data-prefix="fas" data-icon="map-marker-alt" class="svg-inline--fa fa-map-marker-alt fa-w-12" role="img" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 384 512"><path fill="currentColor" d="M172.268 501.67C26.97 291.031 0 269.413 0 192 0 85.961 85.961 0 192 0s192 85.961 192 192c0 77.413-26.97 99.031-172.268 309.67-9.535 13.774-29.93 13.773-39.464 0zM192 272c44.183 0 80-35.817 80-80s-35.817-80-80-80-80 35.817-80 80 35.817 80 80 80z"></path></svg> </p> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/angel-roberson-daniels-commitment-moral-courage-and-transformational-leadership" hreflang="en">Angel Roberson Daniels&#039; Commitment to Moral Courage and Transformational Leadership</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/face-and-flow-finance-how-impact-investing-can-move-racial-and-gender-wealth-gap" hreflang="en">The Face and the Flow of Finance: How Impact Investing can Move the Racial and Gender Wealth Gap </a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/claiming-our-personal-power-conversation-aimee-allison-supporting-leadership-women-color" hreflang="en">Claiming Our Personal Power: A Conversation with Aimee Allison on Supporting the Leadership of Women of Color</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 07 Jul 2021 20:09:05 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 192 at https://socalgrantmakers.org