Funder Op-Ed https://socalgrantmakers.org/ en Why Reparations Matter Now https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/why-reparations-matter-now <span>Why Reparations Matter Now</span> <span><span>Phuong Pham</span></span> <span>Tue, 10/18/2022 - 17:01</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-image"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-image field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field__item"><div> <div class="field field--name-field-media-image field--type-image field--label-visually_hidden"> <div class="field__label visually-hidden">Image</div> <div class="field__item"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/images/2022-10/sipausa_30000188-scaled-2400x0-c-center.jpeg?itok=_GM4NDz-" width="480" height="320" alt="Photo by Aaron Guy Leroux of three young Black women with with fists up in the air" /> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-10-12T09:00:00Z">Wed, 10/12/2022 - 09:00</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="grey">This story was originally published on the <a href="https://www.calwellness.org/stories/why-reparations-matter-now/">California Wellness Foundation website</a>.</p> <hr /><p class="intro">I find that when I talk about reparations for Black Americans, I get a lot of raised eyebrows. People have questions about what the word “reparations” means, whether reparations are relevant in California, and if so, what would meaningful reparations to Black Americans actually entail.</p> <p class="intro">As a health funder, we understand that wealth and health disparities are inextricably linked. We acknowledge that the legacy of slavery and racial discrimination has resulted in debilitating economic, educational, and health hardships that are uniquely experienced by Black Americans. Reparations can take many forms, but we believe a commitment to repair harm to Black Californians will promote healing and transformation in communities across our state.</p> <p class="intro">As funders and as a nation, we must examine the debt owed to the enslaved Africans and their descendants whose forced labor fueled the global economy for centuries and generated the wealth that built this country. The call for economic reparations for Black Americans has gone unanswered for centuries. Today, California can answer the call and atone for the unjust enrichment of this state from slavery together with the systematic and multi-generational exclusion of Black Americans from economic and social opportunities.</p> <h2>California’s Involvement in Slavery</h2> <p>First, we must acknowledge California’s role in <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/chattel-slavery">chattel slavery</a>, white supremacy and racial violence against Black Americans. Chattel slavery came to California with the Gold Rush, when as many as 1,500 enslaved Black Americans were forcibly transported to the state between 1849 and 1861. In 1852, California passed a fugitive slave law that suspended the state constitution’s anti-slavery clause and was used to re-enslave free Black Americans.</p> <p><a href="https://oag.ca.gov/ab3121/reports">In a recent report</a>, the California Task Force to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans living in California outlined the history of government action and inaction that maintained a racial hierarchy and economy based on exploited Black labor:</p> <ul><li>State laws prevented Black Californians from voting and testifying in court.</li> <li>State courts worked in concert with private citizens to steal land lawfully owned by Black citizens.</li> <li>Local governments and police departments were permeated with white supremacist groups like the Ku Klux Klan that terrorized and murdered Black Californians.</li> <li>Racial violence peaked after World War II, as Black Americans attempted to move into white neighborhoods and faced <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/17/realestate/what-is-redlining.html">unethical housing practices like redlining</a>.</li> </ul><p>The task force found these “harms compounded over generations have resulted in an enormous gap in wealth between white and Black Americans today in California.”</p> <h2>Cal Wellness and Reparations</h2> <p>I’m fortunate to work for Cal Wellness because Cal Wellness has been very intentional about identifying and seizing opportunities to support Black-led social change efforts that amplify the voices and experiences of Black Americans. We strive to invest in Black-led solutions to the problems that are identified by the Black community.</p> <p>Cal Wellness was one of the first organizations to invest in the <a href="https://www.blackequitycollective.org/black-equity-initiative">Black Equity Initiative</a> and <a href="https://www.blackequitycollective.org/">Black Equity Collective</a>, a network of funders and communities who partner to strengthen the long-term sustainability of Black-led and Black-empowering organizations in Southern California. We also <a href="https://www.givinglistlosangeles.com/company/bec/">signed a pledge to lift up Black equity</a> within our practices and culture, and we've committed to learning as an institution.</p> <p>We made a significant contribution to the <a href="https://cablackfreedomfund.org/">California Black Freedom Fund</a>, a $100 million initiative created to ensure that Black power-building and movement-based organizations have the ongoing investments and resources they need to help eliminate systemic and institutional racism.</p> <p>We’ve supported <a href="https://bunchecenter.ucla.edu/">UCLA’s Ralph J. Bunche Center</a>’s efforts to bring visibility to the harm experienced by Black Americans in California and engage those same residents in the development of a reparations framework to address the health and social harms caused by institutionalized racism in California.</p> <p>These important steps allow us to be a part of building something robust and sustainable for Black communities in California.</p> <h2>Philanthropy Must Be Bold Now</h2> <p><strong>Let’s focus on philanthropy.</strong> Reparations also matter for the larger philanthropic sector. We often have trouble acknowledging that the majority of philanthropy’s corpus comes from the enslavement of Black bodies and forced labor. But across the sector, philanthropy’s collective inheritance must be reckoned with in order for us to move forward as a society. So what can philanthropy do?</p> <ul><li><strong>Be bold and seize upon this public conversation to mobilize resources for permanent and sustainable recovery for Black people.</strong> As a country we're finally talking about what economic equity and sustainability looks like for Black people. We can’t miss the moment.</li> <li><strong>Build on the reparations report released by the California Task Force and continue to support community organizations so they can continue to move this conversation with community members and decision makers.</strong> California is the first state to have a reparations task force and some of California’s largest Black-led organizations are participating. We have a unique opportunity to invest in building the capacity of Black-led organizations to do advocacy, legal analysis, and research around this issue — in addition to doing strategic communications and narrative change.</li> <li><strong>Invest in permanency. </strong>We should be thinking about how we build the infrastructure in California to sustain Black-led social change efforts. For example, while it's an important step, the California Black Freedom Fund is a temporary fund. California needs a Black community foundation to serve as a permanent institution that generates sustainable revenue and capital to support social change efforts and innovations that strengthen Black economic mobility.</li> </ul><p>In philanthropy, we have the opportunity to both repair, and continue to <strong>invest in changing the structures</strong> in the system that impact Black economic mobility and health. Let’s use the tools we have at our disposal to invest in the possibilities imagined, created and led by Black people, and thereby carry out meaningful change – for today and tomorrow.</p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 19 Oct 2022 00:01:16 +0000 Phuong Pham 1671 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Op-Ed: The Power of Cultural Organizing: A Conversation with IllumiNative https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/op-ed-power-cultural-organizing-conversation-illuminative <span>Op-Ed: The Power of Cultural Organizing: A Conversation with IllumiNative</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Wed, 08/17/2022 - 16:27</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-08-09T16:37:30Z">Tue, 08/09/2022 - 16:37</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">The article below was originally published on the <a href="https://womensfoundca.org/international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-peoples/?utm_source=Women%27s+Foundation+California&amp;utm_campaign=929c8da668-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_08_09_Indigenous_Day&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_a2d29f014c-929c8da668-55857437&amp;mc_cid=929c8da668&amp;mc_eid=2df57ab2bc">Women's Foundation California's website</a>. We invite you to vist their page to <a href="https://womensfoundca.org/international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-peoples/?utm_source=Women%27s+Foundation+California&amp;utm_campaign=929c8da668-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_08_09_Indigenous_Day&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_a2d29f014c-929c8da668-55857437&amp;mc_cid=929c8da668&amp;mc_eid=2df57ab2bc">read the full conversation</a>. If you are an SCG or Philanthropy California Member who would like to contribute or republish an article to our Stories &amp; Ideas page, please contact eddy@socalgrantmakers.org.</p> <hr /><p>Today is <a href="https://www.un.org/en/observances/indigenous-day">International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples</a>. A quick peruse of Twitter confirms that corporations and organizations are adhering to the woke left’s social media schedule, with obligatory shout-outs to the Indigenous peoples of the world. But the time for thoughtful captions with a 24-hour shelf life is long past (and let’s be honest, there was never a time for that!). Native communities continue to safeguard their knowledge, speak truth to power, share their stories, and hold the memory of what has been while imagining what could be with or without our commemorative Tweets today. Our Indigenous communities deserve more – deeper listening from non-Natives and real money, lots of it, to continue holding and sharing the way forward.</p> <p>It’s increasingly clear that our country’s systems are working as intended- to strip women and marginalized people of their rights and bodily autonomy, while expecting them to carry on the responsibilities of keeping our society and economy running. While the current flavor of oppression and blatant disregard for life (see gun violence stats) and our bodily autonomy feels new to me, a 34-year-old white cis woman, (see the overturning of Roe), it’s nothing new for Native communities. </p> <p>As a foundation, we have a long history of supporting Indigenous-led work (<a href="https://mixteco.org/">Mixteco Indigena Community Organizing Project</a>, <a href="https://sogoreate-landtrust.org/">Sogorea Te’ Land Trust</a>, <a href="https://illuminative.org/">IllumiNative</a>, <a href="http://strongheartednativewomen.org/">Strong Hearted Native Women’s Coalition</a>, <a href="https://www.friendshiphousesf.org/">Friendship House Association of American Indians</a>, to name a few), and we have work to do and room to grow.</p> <p>So here’s our ask for today: listen to Native voices and perspectives, support Indigenous-led work with real $$$ and keep showing up with funding, acknowledgments, and celebrations far beyond International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. </p> <p>To kick off the kind of deep listening we’re talking about, we sat down with <a href="https://illuminative.org/">IllumiNative</a>’s Leah Salgado to (re)connect on the power of cultural organizing and building the world we want right now.    </p> <p><a class="button-outline" href="https://womensfoundca.org/international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-peoples/?utm_source=Women%27s+Foundation+California&amp;utm_campaign=929c8da668-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2022_08_09_Indigenous_Day&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_a2d29f014c-929c8da668-55857437&amp;mc_cid=929c8da668&amp;mc_eid=2df57ab2bc">Read the Full Interview</a> </p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/352" hreflang="en">Arts &amp; Culture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/324" hreflang="en">Equity &amp; Racial Justice</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 17 Aug 2022 23:27:12 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1545 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Essential Stories: Understanding the Black Workers Crisis https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/essential-stories-understanding-black-workers-crisis <span>Essential Stories: Understanding the Black Workers Crisis</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/05/2022 - 08:57</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-08-04T10:03:30Z">Thu, 08/04/2022 - 10:03</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>As an employment placement coordinator for Riverside City College, </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Meriel Anderson-McDade</span></span></strong></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> is passionate about helping students through her role. The pandemic has put a strain on her ability to optimally function in her job with a lack of support from her employer. When working remotely during the height of the pandemic, Anderson-McDade states that she and her colleagues “were sent home with nothing,” leading her to question how much her employer values her. “I’ve been using my own computer and cell phone to connect with my students because they need me — they need us,” she said, adding that her union had to fight for her to eventually get the equipment she needed to perform her job adequately. “I still love my college and what I do. I just don’t like how I’ve been treated.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Shekinah Pitts</span></span></strong></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> also shared her experiences with under-employment as an area manager for a food service company. “During the pandemic, I was furloughed - four months on, two months off. And then I was furloughed again for another four months,” said Pitts. “And [we] were forced to use our paid time off instead of being allowed to file for unemployment. So all my time that I had saved up, I had to use that first.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Meriel and Shekinah are just two voices out of millions of Black workers who faced employment challenges or were unaware and thus unprotected by Covid-worker protection laws. Today, many Black workers are still struggling to make ends meet. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Many workers have echoed the prevalence of low wages and unfair and unsafe working conditions, not necessarily a labor shortage.</span></span></strong></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> What they shared revealed the impacts of a long history of anti-Black economic restructures whose adverse effects are disproportionately felt by Black workers, creating a Black jobs crisis. This long-standing crisis is characterized by disproportionate unemployment, underemployment, and systemic racism. We see the symptoms of the Black jobs crisis every day: bad jobs, forced migration, unsafe and discriminatory workplace practices, occupational displacement, and more.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span><span>Collecting Data on the Black Workers Crisis </span></span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p>The <a href="https://socalblackworkersunited.org/"><span><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Southern California Black Worker Hub for Regional Organizing</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> advocates for the economic empowerment of Black workers by supporting various Black Worker Centers in Los Angeles, the Inland Empire, and San Diego. Specifically, the Southern California Black Worker Hub for Regional Organizing helps these centers fight for economic inclusion and opportunities for each region’s Black workers. By serving as a resource for all three worker centers, the Hub is advancing Black economic opportunity throughout the region, creating a more equitable Southern California.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Last year, the </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.labor.ucla.edu/what-we-do/center-for-the-advancement-of-racial-equity-at-work/"><span><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Center for the Advancement of Racial Equity at Work</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> within the UCLA Labor Center, <span>Southern California Black Worker Hub for Regional Organizing</span>, and other anchor partners launched the </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.labor.ucla.edu/publication/essential-stories-black-worker-covid-19-economic-health-impact-survey/"><span><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Essential Stories</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> research project to better understand the experiences and challenges of Black workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. This research project ran in tandem with the Essential Stories </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://covidandblackworkers.org"><span><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>campaign</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>, created to uplift the voices and experiences of Black workers in California led by the anchor partners. They aimed to ensure Black workers receive equitable and long-term COVID-19 recovery support, resources, and protections. The survey engaged nearly 40,000 Southern California Black workers, 2,000 of which completed it, sharing their work experiences, challenges, and demands for support during the COVID-19 pandemic.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>One of the critical points elevated from listening to Black workers’ concerns and demands from the </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.labor.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/bwc_es_report_final.pdf"><span><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Essential Stories</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> report is that today regardless of working status, 57% of Black workers are looking for other job opportunities. This statistic indicates that workers are demanding better opportunities and quality jobs that offer benefits and worker protections.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span><span><span><span><span><span>How Funders Can Support Black Workers</span></span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The SoCal Black Worker Hub needs philanthropic support to elevate the voices and power of Southern California Black workers and scale their solutions to win at the regional, state, and nationwide levels. By building alongside Black workers, funders can support us in moving forward with some of the key solutions outlined in Essential Stories below.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul><li> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Provide ong-term economic support and COVID-19 recovery programming. Although many systems have been created in California as a social safety net, Black workers need the help of CBOs to navigate the current state-funded systems in place. CBOs need support to fill the gap these state-funded programs can not address. Philanthropy can bring down barriers to receiving sustainable, multi-year, unrestricted support. Without this, the constant cycle of injustice will continue. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </li> <li> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Support Black worker wellness by addressing racism as a workplace hazard and increase the availability and accessibility of mental health and wellness services for Black workers. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </li> <li> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Direct workers’ rights training and workforce development funding to Black workers. Funders can support Black worker centers that have developed and implemented robust mechanisms for ‘Know Your Rights” training and resources. Additionally, funders can support workforce development and training for Black workers by investing in apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship programs at the state and community levels. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </li> </ul><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Funders can stay informed and join the fight to end the Black worker’s crisis by visiting the </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><a href="https://socalblackworkersunited.org/"><span><span><span><span><span><span><u><span><span>Southern California Black Workers Hub for Regional Organizing (SoCalBWHub) website</span></span></u></span></span></span></span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>. Funders can also get involved with the Hub’s current programs and campaigns by contacting Regional Development Director Alyce Monet at </span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>amonet@bwhub.org</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> to learn more.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/66" hreflang="en">Community &amp; Economic Development</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/324" hreflang="en">Equity &amp; Racial Justice</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-geo-location-taxonomy"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-pin margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg aria-hidden="true" focusable="false" data-prefix="fas" data-icon="map-marker-alt" class="svg-inline--fa fa-map-marker-alt fa-w-12" role="img" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 384 512"><path fill="currentColor" d="M172.268 501.67C26.97 291.031 0 269.413 0 192 0 85.961 85.961 0 192 0s192 85.961 192 192c0 77.413-26.97 99.031-172.268 309.67-9.535 13.774-29.93 13.773-39.464 0zM192 272c44.183 0 80-35.817 80-80s-35.817-80-80-80-80 35.817-80 80 35.817 80 80 80z"></path></svg> </p> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/black-equity-collective-funding-black-equity" hreflang="en">The Black Equity Collective on Funding Black Equity </a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/fund-us-you-want-us-win-actions-philanthropy-can-take-support-black-communities-and-black" hreflang="en">&quot;Fund Us Like You Want Us to Win&quot;: Actions Philanthropy Can Take to Support Black Communities and Black Leadership</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/reimagining-financial-systems-support-black-businesses-and-entrepreneurship" hreflang="en">Reimagining Financial Systems to Support Black Businesses and Entrepreneurship </a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 05 Aug 2022 15:57:43 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1509 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Op-Ed: How We Increased Grantmaking, Took Risks, and Found Powerful New Models for Change https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/op-ed-how-we-increased-grantmaking-took-risks-and-found-powerful-new-models-change <span>Op-Ed: How We Increased Grantmaking, Took Risks, and Found Powerful New Models for Change</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Fri, 07/15/2022 - 11:42</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-07-13T11:47:10Z">Wed, 07/13/2022 - 11:47</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">This article was <a href="https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2022/7/13/to-truly-support-equity-we-realized-our-foundation-had-to-change-its-practices-and-spend-more">originally published on the Inside Philanthropy website</a>. If you are an SCG Member who would like to contribute an Op-Ed or would like SCG to republish a piece you've written, please contact us at eddy@socalgrantmakers.org. </p> <hr /><p>Two recent, alarming trends drove the foundation I lead, Liberty Hill, to seek out newer, smaller organizations with shorter track records and tiny budgets. In the process, we became newly acquainted with many groups carrying out innovative approaches to building power — and realized we had to change how we operate in order to support them. The lack of funding these organizations receive should challenge other foundations with commitments to equity to ask whether our practices truly serve our principles.</p> <p>The first trend that made us reconsider our own grantmaking was an effect of rapid gentrification. Black and brown people, driven out of metropolitan Los Angeles into “civic deserts” in commuter cities, found themselves with little access to political power, despite rising numbers. What groups, we wanted to know, were addressing these issues? The second trend was the emergence of organizations representing underresourced constituencies such as transgender, Indigenous, and Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander people.</p> <p>Liberty Hill had always prioritized early, consistent and flexible investing in multiracial, immigrant-serving, community-organizing groups. Even so, as we sought to expand our reach, we found no shortage of groups making exciting departures from the models that the foundation had typically supported through four decades.</p> <p>The examples are many and inspiring:</p> <ul><li> <p><strong>Indigenous Pride Los Angeles</strong> is the only organization for Native/Indigenous Queer people in LA. IPLA runs groups and wellness programs for this population and then connects attendees to organizing campaigns. IPLA has called out the lack of a single support group in L.A. for queer indigenous youth to address their mental health issues. Other Indigenous groups lead land-back campaigns and demand representation on public advisory bodies using organizing and power-building approaches rooted in their cultural practices, which look very different from traditional organizing.</p> </li> <li> <p>An emerging housing justice group called the <strong>Los Angeles Center for Community Law and Action</strong> uses a grassroots legal services model that works to reduce reliance on lawyers and a broken court system, based in abolitionist principles. With support from staff attorneys, LACCLA organizers train residents to defend themselves and each other from evictions and abusive and illegal practices by landlords. This innovative combination of legal services, organizing and mutual aid is building power for tenants to address immediate needs and long-term systems change.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Rideshare Drivers United</strong> has warned that many Uber drivers are homeless because Uber reduced driver pay rates to increase profits for investors as they took their company public. RUD has developed innovative software and digital organizing strategies to organize a workforce whose atomization and separation are intrinsic to the industry’s business model.</p> </li> <li> <p>In Chinatown, groups such as the <strong>Southeast Asian Community Alliance</strong> (SEACA) have raised the bar for youth organizing by taking on complex land use issues to stave off gentrification, while also operating COVID vaccination clinics because government cannot reach these residents with culturally competent language and outreach. <strong>Chinatown Community for Equitable Development</strong> has shown us that Chinatown has no grocery stores, laundromat or hospital, it is the poorest neighborhood in L.A., and is advocating for innovative community development models.</p> </li> </ul><p>Often working beneath the radar, these innovators challenge our understanding of what community organizing is and can be. With minimal outside investment, they build long-term resilience from the inside out, using internal organizational structures and leadership practices that center racial and gender equity and healing justice to address burnout, trauma and inadequate resources.</p> <h2>Where we found barriers, we opened doors</h2> <p>Recognizing this need left us with a challenge — how could we invest in these innovative approaches and critical new geographies and constituencies while maintaining our support for our long-term partners with broad reach, who have come to serve as anchors for the L.A. social justice movement?</p> <p>New models of power-building and engagement can’t develop when groups are bound by typical grant application processes and standard assessment criteria. To stay true to our values, Liberty Hill had to overturn our assumptions. We had to <strong>expand outreach</strong>, <strong>make radical accommodations</strong> and <strong>increase endowment spending</strong>.</p> <p>First, we held discussions, surveys and focus groups. Zoom meetings opened up corners of Los Angeles County that we hadn’t yet invested in, where community experts helped us understand how little we knew.</p> <p>Second, we removed our letter-of-intent process in favor of an alignment survey, shortened our application, removed requirements for grantees, and began accepting grant proposals that had already been written for other funders. We interrogated every step of our process in order to make “radical accommodations” such as arranging for language interpretation. Where we found barriers, we created doors, and we invited these “rising activists” — our name for this new cohort — to walk through them. And one significant bonus of these new practices was that they not only helped us connect with these innovative organizations, they also helped us build even deeper trust with those anchor groups that we already thought we knew. </p> <p>Finally, we had to ask what kind of trust we would build if we told groups that their work was worth funding — but that we weren’t going to fund it. Our Community Funding Board, made up of organizers and front-line experts, advised that we make grants to every one of the 19 qualified organizations. Doubling our grantmaking budget, this would throw us into deficit — unless we tripled our typical annual endowment spend, smashing past the 5 to 7% level recommended by California’s Attorney General.</p> <p>I grew up in poverty; a scarcity mindset is deep in my bones. But our endowment investments, like most foundations’, had prospered throughout the COVID years. What, exactly, were we saving up resources for if not this exact moment? Our board approved the withdrawal.</p> <h2>Rising to the moment</h2> <p>It wasn’t a moment too soon. After the pandemic hit, these rising activists had gone into overdrive, and they were simultaneously proving their worth anew while also straining themselves to meet the need in their communities. </p> <p>They created networks for mutual aid, providing food, child care and money to keep the lights on. Many pivoted from political organizing to dropping groceries at members’ homes. They provided life-saving public health information to communities that did not trust or have access to government programs. Members of Rideshare Drivers United even reallocated stimulus to one another based on need in a jaw-dropping display of solidarity and mutual care.</p> <p>Ultimately, leaving our comfort zone was less risky than remaining inside it. To donors and grantees alike, bold moves in support of equity demonstrate our long-term health. Donors perk up when they see that they’re making a difference. Partners are more likely to trust us. Fellow foundations will be more likely to follow our lead. And they should.</p> <p>It’s natural to have blind spots when it comes to standard operating procedure — even for Liberty Hill, known for investing in risk-taking, grassroots activism — but those blind spots give us a dangerously narrow view of a vital ecosystem. If application processes and fiscal practices prevent investment in small, innovative, lesser-known organizations, those processes and practices have to change. </p> <p>The activists’ rising, life-saving importance during the pandemic reinforces this point. We can’t, on the one hand, rely on organizations to fix holes in our safety net, and, on the other hand, not fund them to do that work. And if we want to understand how badly that safety net failed marginalized communities, we should start by asking the people who proved capable of serving them.</p> <p>To preserve the legacy that has been passed down to us, we must constantly question our assumptions. Only then can we hand that legacy to the next generation in a form we can be proud of. </p> <p>For a list of emerging power-building organizations in L.A. with budgets under $500,000,<a href="https://www.libertyhill.org/how-we-work/grantmaking/rising-activists/"> visit our website</a>.</p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/66" hreflang="en">Community &amp; Economic Development</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/324" hreflang="en">Equity &amp; Racial Justice</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-geo-location-taxonomy"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-pin margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg aria-hidden="true" focusable="false" data-prefix="fas" data-icon="map-marker-alt" class="svg-inline--fa fa-map-marker-alt fa-w-12" role="img" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 384 512"><path fill="currentColor" d="M172.268 501.67C26.97 291.031 0 269.413 0 192 0 85.961 85.961 0 192 0s192 85.961 192 192c0 77.413-26.97 99.031-172.268 309.67-9.535 13.774-29.93 13.773-39.464 0zM192 272c44.183 0 80-35.817 80-80s-35.817-80-80-80-80 35.817-80 80 35.817 80 80 80z"></path></svg> </p> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/op-ed-how-we-can-stem-rising-tide-gun-violence" hreflang="en">Op-Ed: How We Can Stem the Rising Tide of Gun Violence</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/op-ed-giving-more-when-people-need-us-most" hreflang="en">Op-Ed: Giving More When People Need Us Most</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/generational-opportunity-drought-resilient-california" hreflang="en">A Generational Opportunity for a Drought-Resilient California </a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 15 Jul 2022 18:42:12 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1459 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Op-Ed: How We Can Stem the Rising Tide of Gun Violence https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/op-ed-how-we-can-stem-rising-tide-gun-violence <span>Op-Ed: How We Can Stem the Rising Tide of Gun Violence</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/02/2022 - 10:03</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-06-01T10:04:25Z">Wed, 06/01/2022 - 10:04</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">This blog was <a href="https://www.calwellness.org/stories/stem-tide-of-gun-violence/">originally published</a> by The California Wellness Foundation, a member of Socal Grantmakers. If you are an SCG Member who would like to contribute an Op-Ed or written article, please contact eddy@socalgrantmakers.org. </p> <hr /><p>Twenty-three years ago, I vividly recall watching teenagers my age running from school buildings and jumping out of broken windows in terror. I was a senior in high school when 13 people, including 12 students were killed at Columbine High School. It was shocking and unfathomable at the time.</p> <p>Ten years later, we saw the images of parents collapsing in grief after the unthinkable shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. These were babies.</p> <p><em>Surely something would change. What if this were your child?</em></p> <p>Again, in 2018 we watched as kids took cell phone videos of themselves hiding and barricaded in their classrooms, absolutely terrified when a shooter killed 17 teenagers at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.</p> <p><em>Still, nothing.</em></p> <p>In the past few weeks, a racist man with a gun killed 10 Black people shopping for groceries in Buffalo, New York in a hate-fueled attack. The next day, a gunman attacked a lunch banquet at a Taiwanese church in Laguna Woods. And, as the news rolled out about a shooting at a school in Uvalde, Texas, we watched with a collective knowledge of what the outcome would be. More babies killed, families shattered, communities devastated.</p> <p>We have barely made it through the first half of 2022 and there have already been <a href="https://www.npr.org/2022/05/15/1099008586/mass-shootings-us-2022-tally-number">more than 200 mass shootings in the U.S</a>. Moreover, gun violence persists in communities on a daily basis. The resulting trauma is incessant, communities are in pain and it is not okay.<br /><br /><em>What can we do?  </em></p> <p><a href="https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1807277?query=featured_home">Gun violence is a preventable public health epidemic</a> that devastates communities and disproportionately harms communities of color. We know that these unthinkable — yet near-constant — mass shooting tragedies are connected to the larger problem of gun violence that plagues this country.  Here are some things we can continue to do:</p> <ul><li> <p><strong>Make policy changes that end easy access to guns.</strong> Guns are shockingly easy to obtain, and most guns used in crime and shootings are purchased legally. The proliferation of assault weapons and “ghost guns” must be dealt with using policy change. And we know that <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/27/us/uvalde-texas-elementary-school-shooting-friday/index.html">the narrative of</a> “a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun” is false—the bottom line is that we need fewer guns, not more. We also must encourage additional support and funding of gun violence research programs, such as the <a href="https://health.ucdavis.edu/vprp/">Violence Prevention Research Program</a> at UC Davis, which works on evidence-based research that informs decision-makers.</p> </li> </ul><ul><li> <p><strong>Support violence-reduction programs informed by community.</strong> Organizations such as <a href="https://www.cityofsacramento.org/-/media/Corporate/Files/CMO/Gang-Prevention/Resources/AModelofCommunitySafety.pdf?la=en">Advance Peace</a> in Sacramento have shown proven success in their strategies focusing on the small percentage of individuals who are most likely to be violent or become victims of gun violence. <a href="https://www.youthalive.org/">Youth ALIVE!</a> and <a href="https://buildprogram.org/#:~:text=BUILD%20works%20to%20increase%20public,increase%20community%20health%20and%20safety.">BUILD Program</a> are other intervention-focused organizations that educate and train young leaders and work to interrupt the cycle of street violence.</p> </li> </ul><ul><li> <p><strong>Address the</strong> <strong>trauma experienced by people exposed to gun violence</strong>. Generational trauma and systemic oppression are mental health crises – and statistics show that cycles will repeat if not addressed. After a shooting, we must provide healing and trauma aftercare services for communities. In California, <a href="https://rysecenter.org/">RYSE Center</a> and the <a href="https://www.nationalcompadresnetwork.org/">National Compadres Network</a> are doing an amazing job with this work.</p> </li> </ul><p><strong>Creating a path forward</strong></p> <p>We must remain committed to taking action to end these preventable cycles of gun violence. Recently, we saw high school <a href="https://abcnews.go.com/US/students-walk-schools-protest-gun-violence/story?id=85000148">students staging walkouts throughout the country</a> to protest gun violence. <a href="https://www.calwellness.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/Cal-Wellness_Gun-Violence-Prevention.pdf" rel="noopener" target="_blank">As a foundation</a>, our work via the <a href="https://www.calwellness.org/money/what-we-fund/community-well-being/">Community Well-being grantmaking portfolio</a> will continue to support organizations focused on gun violence research, policy advocacy, innovative models addressing gun violence and efforts to ensure day-to-day violence does not go unnoticed by the media. And our grantee partners, including the <a href="https://www.thehavi.org/">Health Alliance for Violence Intervention</a>, <a href="https://giffords.org/lawcenter/gun-laws/">Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence</a>, <a href="https://nicjr.org/">the National Institute for Criminal Justice Reform</a>, <a href="https://communityjusticerc.org/home">Community Justice Reform Coalition</a>, <a href="https://www.bradyunited.org/">Brady Center To Prevent Gun Violence</a>, <a href="https://hopeandhealfund.org/">Hope and Heal Fund</a>, <a href="https://livefreeusa.org/">Live Free</a>, <a href="https://efsgv.org/">Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violence</a> and others, continue to lead efforts to reduce gun and community violence.</p> <p>We don’t have the option to walk away if we want to see change. Onward!</p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/324" hreflang="en">Equity &amp; Racial Justice</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-geo-location-taxonomy"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-pin margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg aria-hidden="true" focusable="false" data-prefix="fas" data-icon="map-marker-alt" class="svg-inline--fa fa-map-marker-alt fa-w-12" role="img" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 384 512"><path fill="currentColor" d="M172.268 501.67C26.97 291.031 0 269.413 0 192 0 85.961 85.961 0 192 0s192 85.961 192 192c0 77.413-26.97 99.031-172.268 309.67-9.535 13.774-29.93 13.773-39.464 0zM192 272c44.183 0 80-35.817 80-80s-35.817-80-80-80-80 35.817-80 80 35.817 80 80 80z"></path></svg> </p> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/leading-boldly-leaders-front-lines-social-change" hreflang="en">Leading Boldly: Leaders on the Front Lines for Social Change</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/generational-opportunity-drought-resilient-california" hreflang="en">A Generational Opportunity for a Drought-Resilient California </a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/op-ed-giving-more-when-people-need-us-most" hreflang="en">Op-Ed: Giving More When People Need Us Most</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 02 Jun 2022 17:03:20 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1369 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Op-Ed: Giving More When People Need Us Most https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/op-ed-giving-more-when-people-need-us-most <span>Op-Ed: Giving More When People Need Us Most</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/01/2022 - 20:43</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-subheadline"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-subheadline field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Why the California Wellness Foundation Supports Efforts to Reform Philanthropy </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-05-31T08:53:01Z">Tue, 05/31/2022 - 08:53</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">This blog was <a href="https://www.calwellness.org/stories/giving-more-when-people-need-us-most/">originally published</a> on The California Wellness Foundation website. If you are an SCG Member who would like to contribute an Op-Ed or written article, please contact eddy@socalgrantmakers.org</p> <hr /><p>The devastating economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in millions of people across the country struggling to pay for their basic needs. Meanwhile, private foundations have grown wealthier. Cal Wellness’ own endowment stands at $1.16 billion, an increase of 15% from pre-pandemic levels.</p> <p>Given the scale of compounded crises confronting our state and nation, we refuse to accept the status quo of institutions like ours getting richer while communities are suffering. Like many foundation colleagues, we at Cal Wellness have increased our giving during the pandemic and simplified our grantmaking processes to address the current crises. But bold, fundamental shifts across our sector are needed for philanthropy to truly help communities to thrive.</p> <h2 class="h2-sm">Reforming Our Ways</h2> <p>That’s why Cal Wellness is exploring how we and our private foundation peers can lead the way in reforming our sector. Changes we have made to increase our giving include:</p> <ul><li> <p><strong>Setting a payout policy that provides us with the flexibility to go beyond the 5% <em>minimum</em></strong> in our annual giving.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Investing our endowment in alignment with our mission</strong> for positive social impact and healthy returns.</p> </li> </ul><p>Before we go further, a little background and context for folks unfamiliar with laws governing philanthropy might be helpful:</p> <p>Currently, a private foundation is <a href="https://learning.candid.org/resources/knowledge-base/payout/">legally required to give 5% annually</a> of its investment assets as grants, program-related investments, or to cover operating expenses in order to receive tax benefits as a nonprofit organization. But this thinking does not factor in the immediate needs of communities, which is the purpose of philanthropy.</p> <p>So, in 2019, after a series of learning sessions with peer foundations and financial advisors, <strong>our board of directors</strong> <strong>approved an annual payout policy that considers current community need and strategic opportunities</strong> in addition to our assets and tax history. Our new policy set a minimum payout of 5% and allows for distributions above 6% when there are unique opportunities for impact or during times of critical need. As a result, <strong>we have given at or above 6% over the last two years</strong>, and in 2021 we gave $52 million total in grants and program-related investments, up from $34.5 million in 2019. Our projected payout for 2022 is close to 7% and this calculation excludes our program-related investments. While we’ve done forecasting that shows that increasing our payout above 5% may erode our corpus, we believe the risk is worth taking.</p> <p>Still, the majority of our assets remain in our endowment. And so we’re putting those dollars to work for our charitable purpose as well and challenging investment norms for foundation endowments along the way. In 2016 we established a mission-related investment portfolio of $40 million for MRIs, with an additional $10 million for program-related investments. In 2022 we will begin<strong> moving our entire endowment into mission-related investments, including up to 5% in program-related investments.</strong> We currently screen out tobacco and firearms in our investments, and we favor investment managers that use environmental, social and governance criteria. We’re also learning about the impact of investments on climate change and hope to follow the lead of our colleagues who have taken a proactive stand.</p> <p>We’re particularly proud of our <strong>commitment to invest our money with diverse managers, particularly people of color and women</strong>. In 2014, none of our money managers were people of color but now they account for over 45% of the team. Over the next two years, we also aim to <strong>establish a shareholder engagement strategy</strong> to ensure that our values are aligned with those managing our assets. We will use our shareholder engagement strategy as a tool to raise our voice.</p> <p>By re-engineering how we steward our endowment, we are ensuring that all our financial resources support our mission and values.</p> <h2 class="h2-sm">Rallying the Sector</h2> <p>Sector-driven campaigns, such as the <a href="https://acceleratecharitablegiving.org/">Initiative to Accelerate Charitable Giving</a>, which Cal Wellness has endorsed, are promoting tax reforms that could increase and accelerate the flow of resources to community-based organizations. For example, the IACG has proposed suspending the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/private-foundations/private-foundation-excise-taxes">excise tax on investment earnings</a> for years when private foundation payout exceeds 7%. Bipartisan legislation may soon formalize some of the proposals advanced by philanthropic reform coalitions. But current efforts are largely focused on donor-advised funds, and neither reform groups nor proposed legislation are pushing private foundations to increase payout minimums.</p> <p>When we prioritize resources for our own perpetuity, we shortchange our most vulnerable communities. And those communities need foundation resources now more than ever before. <strong>We call upon our private foundation peers to make 5% their payout minimum and to adopt investment strategies for their endowments that advance their missions and reflect their values. </strong></p> <p>And we invite all our partners in philanthropy to engage with us as we work to challenge the status quo. We know that the changes we have made are only the beginning and we welcome ideas on how we can move the needle even more. Please reach out to <a href="mailto:publicaffairs@calwellness.org">publicaffairs@calwellness.org</a> to get in touch with Richard and Stephanie.</p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/324" hreflang="en">Equity &amp; Racial Justice</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-geo-location-taxonomy"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-pin margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg aria-hidden="true" focusable="false" data-prefix="fas" data-icon="map-marker-alt" class="svg-inline--fa fa-map-marker-alt fa-w-12" role="img" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 384 512"><path fill="currentColor" d="M172.268 501.67C26.97 291.031 0 269.413 0 192 0 85.961 85.961 0 192 0s192 85.961 192 192c0 77.413-26.97 99.031-172.268 309.67-9.535 13.774-29.93 13.773-39.464 0zM192 272c44.183 0 80-35.817 80-80s-35.817-80-80-80-80 35.817-80 80 35.817 80 80 80z"></path></svg> </p> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/op-ed-gender-health-and-war-ukraine" hreflang="en">Op-Ed: Gender, Health, and the War in Ukraine</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/generational-opportunity-drought-resilient-california" hreflang="en">A Generational Opportunity for a Drought-Resilient California </a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/leading-boldly-leaders-front-lines-social-change" hreflang="en">Leading Boldly: Leaders on the Front Lines for Social Change</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 02 Jun 2022 03:43:46 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1368 at https://socalgrantmakers.org A Generational Opportunity for a Drought-Resilient California https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/generational-opportunity-drought-resilient-california <span>A Generational Opportunity for a Drought-Resilient California </span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/11/2022 - 11:40</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-05-11T10:40:52Z">Wed, 05/11/2022 - 10:40</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">On World Water Day (March 22), clean water advocates across the state joined California Governor Gavin Newsom to announce the <a href="https://waterfdn.org/gov-newsom-clean-water-advocates-announce-drought-resilience-challenge/">Drought Resilience Challenge</a>, a public-private partnership to direct philanthropic investment into transformative changes to California’s water management in the face of climate change. The Challenge was launched at a critical moment in the state’s drought history.  </p> <p>California began this year with the driest first few months on record. Unfortunately, the status quo will likely lead to more unrelenting heat, ferocious wildfires, dried-up wells, toxic tap water, and parched farmland. California is home to the most billionaires in the nation, but an estimated 1 million Californians lack regular access to clean drinking water. Water-insecure residents are predominantly people of color whose water can be laced with arsenic, nitrate, or hexavalent chromium, chemicals linked to skin lesions, birth defects, and stomach cancers. In the surrounding rivers and streams, migratory birds are disappearing while certain salmon runs, which are critical to the way of life of Native people, face extinction. </p> <h2 class="h2-sm">Investments in Drought Relief and Water Resilience</h2> <p>Leaders who make decisions about water have historically failed to prioritize the lowest-income communities and the state’s most fragile ecosystems, so public dollars traditionally bypass the people and wildlife that need them most. However, tides may change. This past year saw unprecedented public investment in water infrastructure. California allocated $5 billion for drought relief and water management, while the federal infrastructure law approved $3.5 billion for clean drinking water and related infrastructure in the state and more than $4.5 billion for watershed restoration nationally. </p> <p>The Newsom administration recognizes the importance of supporting underrepresented communities in building the necessary power and organizational capacity to advance sustainable policies and practices. The Drought Resilience Challenge will help ensure that public water funding serves natural ecosystems and all communities, particularly those who have historically been excluded, including Black and brown communities, immigrant communities, and indigenous communities. The lived experience of individuals most affected by drought conditions enables them to best understand, design, and drive durable decisions. These water leaders will stay committed to fighting for — and carrying out — policies and projects that help their communities. This may include drinking water treatment and projects that restore natural habitats or replenish groundwater.</p> <h2 class="h2-sm">Frontline Leaders Need Our Support</h2> <p>While the Drought Resilience Challenge is about long-term resilience, our frontline leaders are also addressing the immediate needs generated by California’s current drought disaster. Clean water needs to move swiftly to communities and failing ecosystems that need it. The Challenge couples these crisis responses with preventative measures that correct inequitable decisions of the past. </p> <p>True systemic drought resilience is possible when philanthropy is deployed in this manner. For instance, amid the 2012-2016 drought, community-based organizations, advocacy organizations, and funders formed a coalition to address the alarming problem of rapidly depleting groundwater. The resulting <a href="https://water.ca.gov/programs/groundwater-management/sgma-groundwater-management">Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA)</a> prohibits those pumping water from the ground from damaging other water users, water quality, and the environment and sets a date of 2040 to return California’s aquifers to sustainability. The SGMA law established one of the most progressive groundwater programs in the nation. As focus shifts to implementation, philanthropy needs to continue to work with groups statewide to ensure the law is carried out effectively and equitably. </p> <h2 class="h2-sm">Philanthropy’s Role in the Drought Resilience Challenge</h2> <p>The Drought Resilience Challenge will be housed at and deployed by the <a href="https://waterfdn.org/">Water Foundation</a>, a public foundation leading philanthropic efforts to solve some of the most challenging water challenges across California and the nation. The Water Foundation brings expertise on interconnected water issues, grantmaking capacity, deep relationships with partners in the field, and a tested model for deploying resources quickly where they are most needed. Resources pooled through the Challenge will be used to: </p> <ul><li> <p><strong>Build</strong> community power and capacity to benefit from public funding</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Support</strong> water leaders who can represent the community and science-based priorities so they can design solutions that work for communities and nature</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Pivot</strong> toward systemic solutions by aligning relief and recovery efforts with long-term strategies and investments</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Promote</strong> sustainable strategies for land repurposing, landscape-scale restoration, and re-matriation of lands and waters to indigenous communities. </p> </li> </ul><p>The vision of the California Drought Resilience Challenge is a truly equitable and resilient water system for nature and all people. A wave of change is just beginning to break. Amid unprecedented public investment in water, community organizations are ready to ignite people into participatory action. Philanthropy — particularly funders who live or work in California —can’t let this wave pass us by. Let’s add momentum by addressing the immediate needs of water-insecure communities and threatened ecosystems and making the long-term investments needed to help communities sustain, steward, and share our most precious resource. </p> <p><em>To learn more about the <a href="https://waterfdn.org/gov-newsom-clean-water-advocates-announce-drought-resilience-challenge/">California Drought Resilience Challenge</a>, please reach out to <strong>Nikki Verhoff</strong>, Director of Strategic Partnerships at nverhoff@waterfdn.org.</em></p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/359" hreflang="en">Environment</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-geo-location-taxonomy"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-pin margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg aria-hidden="true" focusable="false" data-prefix="fas" data-icon="map-marker-alt" class="svg-inline--fa fa-map-marker-alt fa-w-12" role="img" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" viewBox="0 0 384 512"><path fill="currentColor" d="M172.268 501.67C26.97 291.031 0 269.413 0 192 0 85.961 85.961 0 192 0s192 85.961 192 192c0 77.413-26.97 99.031-172.268 309.67-9.535 13.774-29.93 13.773-39.464 0zM192 272c44.183 0 80-35.817 80-80s-35.817-80-80-80-80 35.817-80 80 35.817 80 80 80z"></path></svg> </p> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/let-frontlines-lead-supporting-grassroots-movements-climate-resilient-future" hreflang="en">Let the Frontlines Lead: Supporting Grassroots Movements for a Climate-Resilient Future</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/centering-undocumented-californians-and-migrants-disaster-resilience" hreflang="en">Centering Undocumented Californians and Migrants in Disaster Resilience</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/whos-organizing-volunteers-look-behind-scenes-local-disaster-response" hreflang="en">Who’s Organizing the Volunteers? A Look Behind the Scenes in Local Disaster Response</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 11 May 2022 18:40:20 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1313 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Leading Boldly: Leaders on the Front Lines for Social Change https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/leading-boldly-leaders-front-lines-social-change <span>Leading Boldly: Leaders on the Front Lines for Social Change</span> <span><span>Phuong Pham</span></span> <span>Thu, 05/05/2022 - 09:52</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-05-04T12:21:16Z">Wed, 05/04/2022 - 12:21</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">A year ago, the USC Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy (CPPP) asked if I would develop a discussion series focused on leadership and social change. What emerged is <a href="https://cppp.usc.edu/forums-roundtables/leading-boldly/"><em><strong>Leading Boldly</strong></em></a>, an interview series that highlights the struggles as well as accomplishments of innovative and fearless leaders of color advancing racial justice and systems change. </p> <p>While bold leadership approaches have proven effective in addressing systemic inequities, creative ideas and new ways of organizing are often ignored. Emerging leaders struggle to find the resources needed to test their ideas and advance promising solutions. Bold leadership must be encouraged and supported at the scale necessary to advance equity and racial injustice.</p> <p>Over the past year, I have had the honor to interview four remarkable social justice leaders, who shared their personal stories and reflected on their leadership journey:</p> <ol><li> <p><strong>Desmond Meade</strong>, the President of Florida Rights Coalition, overcame drug addiction, homelessness, and incarceration to lead one of the most inspiring and successful grassroots campaigns in history. </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Greisa Martinez Rosas</strong>, Executive Director of United We Dream, the largest youth-led immigrant rights organization, drew inspiration from challenging life experiences to commit to a life of activism and organizing. </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Phi Nguyen</strong> left a successful legal practice to focus on building a more equitable world and became the Executive Director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice shortly after the murder of eight women at three spas in metropolitan Atlanta. </p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Reverend Jennifer Bailey</strong>, the Founder and Executive Director of the Faith Matters Network, used her early life experiences with faith, loss, and race to propel her commitment to building and sustaining the capacity of social justice movements and leaders. </p> </li> </ol><p>I divided the interviews into three parts:</p> <p><strong>Motivation and Commitment</strong></p> <blockquote> <p>Maybe I could take these things that led me to the railroad tracks and contemplating suicide, take these things and use them in such a way to help other people, and that’s been my journey ever since. (Desmond Meade)</p> </blockquote> <p><strong>Leadership Journey</strong></p> <blockquote> <p>The role of the leader is often lonely. It’s often really lonely…so if I could go back and talk to my 24-year-old girl self, I would probably say it’s ok to grow deep and wide, and not fast and long (Reverend Jennifer Bailey) </p> </blockquote> <p><strong>Advice for Philanthropy </strong></p> <blockquote> <p>One obvious way that philanthropy can support leaders like me is we need money to do our work; money that is not overly restrictive. Philanthropy needs to trust leaders to be the ones to make strategic decisions. They’re the ones who are invested in their communities and who know their communities. (Phi Nguyen)</p> </blockquote> <p>These extraordinary individuals were motivated by something more significant than the work itself, as was reflected in their compelling personal stories and lived experiences. Most impressive was a commonly held belief in a discipline of radical hope, maybe best expressed by Greisa Martinez Rosas:</p> <blockquote> <p>Crossing the Rio Grande River, I just remember feeling scared and hanging onto that rock for dear life and having to make a decision about what is the next pathway forward. I felt what guided me in that moment, what made me understand that I needed to take a deep breath and move forward was this deep, deep belief in the discipline of hope that there was gonna be something better on the other side of that river — that’s what grounds my work. </p> </blockquote> <p>They talked candidly about the difficulty of the work while evidencing a willingness to persevere despite obstacles and setbacks. They also acknowledged the importance of expressing vulnerability, seeing this as a strength rather than a weakness. I initially found this extraordinary, given how relatively early they all are in their leadership journey. But as the interviews progressed, it also became clear that these four individuals were bringing refreshing new thinking and innovative approaches to advance social change.</p> <p>Another common theme emerged: a collaborative, inclusive, intersectional leadership approach emerged. There was a willingness to use their voice and lean into their power while also empowering others. </p> <p>Finally, there was no hesitation in talking directly to philanthropy about what they need: invest, trust, and get out of the way; embrace risk, give us space to fail, and the rewards will be greater; use your convening power to go beyond the grant to provide resources that will support our work and our leadership journey. </p> <p>At the start of the series, I frequently used the term emerging leaders to describe the individuals I was interviewing. I now find myself concerned that people might mistake the term “emerging leader” for not yet ready to perform fully. I have watched philanthropy fall into that trap repeatedly, preferring to support traditionally prepared, established leaders. This series illustrates that these four social justice leaders, and so many others like them across this nation, have already emerged. They bring new skills, fresh ideas, and different approaches to advancing opportunity and justice. </p> <p><strong>The Leading Boldly series will begin virtual broadcasts on May 18 at 10:00 AM PDT and can be viewed on The USC Center on Philanthropy &amp; Public Policy's website below.  </strong></p> <p><a class="button-outline" href="https://cppp.usc.edu/forums-roundtables/leading-boldly/"><strong>REGISTER NOW</strong></a></p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-topics"> <div class="block-content"> <p class="display-inline-block icon-starburst margin-top-zero margin-right-sm margin-bottom-zero small-text"> <svg data-name='Layer 1' viewBox='0 0 17.32 17.32'> <path d='M12,17.19c-.2,1.06-.95,1.26-1.67.45a1.67,1.67,0,0,0-2.58, 0c-.7.82-1.45.62-1.66-.44a1.68,1.68,0,0,0-2.25-1.28c-1, .36-1.57-.19-1.22-1.21A1.67,1.67,0,0,0,1.31,12.5C.25,12.3.05, 11.55.86,10.83a1.67,1.67,0,0,0,0-2.58C0,7.55.22,6.8,1.28,6.59A1.68,1.68, 0,0,0,2.56,4.34c-.36-1,.19-1.57,1.21-1.22A1.67,1.67,0,0,0,6,1.81C6.2.75, 7,.55,7.67,1.36a1.67,1.67,0,0,0,2.58,0c.7-.82,1.45-.62,1.66.44a1.68,1.68, 0,0,0,2.25,1.28c1-.36,1.57.19,1.22,1.21A1.67,1.67,0,0,0,16.69,6.5c1.06.2,1.26, 1,.45,1.67a1.67,1.67,0,0,0,0,2.58c.82.7.62,1.45-.44,1.66a1.68,1.68,0,0, 0-1.28,2.25c.36,1-.19,1.57-1.21,1.22A1.67,1.67,0,0,0,12,17.19Z' transform='translate(-0.34 -0.84)'/> </svg> </p> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/324" hreflang="en">Equity &amp; Racial Justice</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/becoming-authentic-leader-conversation-christine-essel-and-judy-belk" hreflang="en">Becoming an Authentic Leader: A Conversation with Christine Essel and Judy Belk</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/fund-us-you-want-us-win-actions-philanthropy-can-take-support-black-communities-and-black" hreflang="en">&quot;Fund Us Like You Want Us to Win&quot;: Actions Philanthropy Can Take to Support Black Communities and Black Leadership</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/angel-roberson-daniels-commitment-moral-courage-and-transformational-leadership" hreflang="en">Angel Roberson Daniels&#039; Commitment to Moral Courage and Transformational Leadership</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 05 May 2022 16:52:33 +0000 Phuong Pham 1300 at https://socalgrantmakers.org The Black Equity Collective on Funding Black Equity https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/black-equity-collective-funding-black-equity <span>The Black Equity Collective on Funding Black Equity </span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Thu, 03/10/2022 - 14:23</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-subheadline"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-subheadline field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">How the Black Equity Initiative paved the way for the Black Equity Collective. </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-03-09T14:25:15Z">Wed, 03/09/2022 - 14:25</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">Supported by the JIB Fund in 2017, the Black Equity Initiative (BEI) was formed with the goal of funding Black-led and Black-serving organizations working to confront systemic racism. It has since become a model for community-responsive grant-making for racial justice. SCG is proud to serve as a fiscal sponsor for the Black Equity Collective. </p></div> </div> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><div class="align-center"> <div class="field field--name-field-media-oembed-video field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item"><iframe src="/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/XOiVqPFKVE8&amp;max_width=0&amp;max_height=0&amp;hash=6XdjARNFJB1s2t5tdj54zBCP3eXDbfxSQQ3ZTjxUwv4" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="200" height="113" class="media-oembed-content" title="FUNDING BLACK EQUITY"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p><a class="chevron" href="https://socalgrantmakers.box.com/s/0o9ba6jdr4zxzevhx9wi3rqbmqc9ufri" title="Video transcript">Click here to view video transcript.</a></p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-attachment-links"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-attachment-links field--type-link field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">External Links</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOiVqPFKVE8">Watch Now</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-funding-area"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="find-more-by-sm margin-top-xl margin-bottom-sm">Find More By</div> <div class="field field--name-field-funding-area field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Funding Area</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/324" hreflang="en">Equity &amp; Racial Justice</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-related-blogs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-related-blogs field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Related Blogs</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/black-equity-collectives-vision-racial-justice-and-liberation" hreflang="en">The Black Equity Collective’s Vision for Racial Justice and Liberation</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/fund-us-you-want-us-win-actions-philanthropy-can-take-support-black-communities-and-black" hreflang="en">&quot;Fund Us Like You Want Us to Win&quot;: Actions Philanthropy Can Take to Support Black Communities and Black Leadership</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/blog/reimagining-financial-systems-support-black-businesses-and-entrepreneurship" hreflang="en">Reimagining Financial Systems to Support Black Businesses and Entrepreneurship </a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-files"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-files field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Documents</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/media/287" hreflang="en">BEC Investing Equity Transcript</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 10 Mar 2022 22:23:45 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1152 at https://socalgrantmakers.org Op-Ed: Gender, Health, and the War in Ukraine https://socalgrantmakers.org/blog/op-ed-gender-health-and-war-ukraine <span>Op-Ed: Gender, Health, and the War in Ukraine</span> <span><span>Eddy Gonzalez</span></span> <span>Thu, 03/10/2022 - 14:06</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-subheadline"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-subheadline field--type-string field--label-hidden field__item">Women and girls face increased levels of gender-based violence and interruptions to maternal health care, among other grave risks.</div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-publication-date"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-publication-date field--type-datetime field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Publication date</div> <div class="field__item"><time datetime="2022-03-09T10:07:10Z">Wed, 03/09/2022 - 10:07</time> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-content-paragraphs"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-content-paragraphs field--type-entity-reference-revisions field--label-hidden field__items"> <div class="margin-bottom-xl paragraph paragraph--type--textarea paragraph--view-mode--default"> <div class="field field--name-field-text-long-formatted field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="intro">This story was <a href="https://www.directrelief.org/2022/03/gender-health-and-the-war-in-ukraine/">originally published</a> by Direct Relief. If you are an SCG Member who would like to contribute an Op-Ed or written article, please contact Eddy Gonzalez. </p> <hr /><p>Today, multiple press reports are <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-60675599">confirming that a Russian missile struck a maternity and children's hospital in the city of Mariupol, Ukraine</a>. Staff and patients, including children, appear to be trapped under the rubble, and total casualty numbers are unknown.</p> <p>In addition to the obvious human rights violations of deliberately targeting a maternity and children's hospital, the attack highlights several gendered risks facing civilians in the Ukraine crisis. At such a moment, it's essential to think about the role that gender and health play in conflict situations, and how best to respond to related needs.</p> <h2>Demographics in Ukraine</h2> <p>Prior to the war, Ukraine had a demographic profile that was highly skewed by gender: The overall population was composed of 54% women to 46% men.</p> <p>That gendered disparity gets even wider when looking at the upper ends of the age distribution. Whereas the number of younger people in Ukraine leans slightly male, there is an extreme lean towards females in people above age 45.</p> <p>By far the greatest disparity occurs between men and women in their 70s and 80s. Ukrainian men tend to live shorter lives than Ukrainian women, which is reflected in the proportion of men and women over the age of 70 in the country. On average, women tend to outlive men in Ukraine by about 10 years.</p> <h2>Displacement</h2> <p>The refugee evacuations from Ukraine have likely altered this demographic picture somewhat. Of the 2 million people who have fled the country since the war started, roughly half are children under the age of 18, and men between the ages of 18 and 60 are essentially not permitted to leave the country, given the needs of the Ukrainian war effort.</p> <p>Men are far more likely to experience traumatic injuries because of combat, while women are more likely to face a host of other health risks and vulnerabilities. In part due to the highly skewed gender distribution of the Ukrainian population, the best current estimates from the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees indicate that, prior to the conflict, nearly 60% of internally displaced persons within Ukraine were female. This surely continues to be the case today, and the number has likely increased somewhat during the conflict.</p> <p>As a result, it is entirely reasonable to suggest that the health needs of displaced persons, whether they are in Ukraine or have fled the country, represent the needs of women to a great degree.</p> <h2>Non-communicable diseases</h2> <p>In addition to the issues of maternal health and gender-based violence, discussed below, it's important to understand the problem of gendered differences in the incidence and risk factors of non-communicable diseases like diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Differences in exposure to non-communicable diseases account for a significant amount of the overall gendered population disparity.</p> <p>For example, the World Health Organization published a report in 2020 on non-communicable diseases in Ukraine, looking in part at disparities in risk factors such as smoking, diet, physical activity, obesity, and blood pressure. Here's what the gender distribution looks like by age group for men and women - specifically, their likelihood of having three or more significant risk factors:</p> <p>These risk factors tended to be somewhat more extreme for women and men in urban versus rural areas. Differences by income were minimal, and middle-aged men had higher rates of alcohol consumption. However, the main difference is that Ukrainian men tend to die of non-communicable diseases at an earlier age than women do. Older Ukrainian women tend to live with the consequences and higher incidence of non-communicable diseases.</p> <h2>Maternal Health</h2> <p>Over the past 20 years or so, Ukraine has made significant progress in reducing the risks to women in childbirth. During that time, the maternal mortality ratio went from 35 to 19 people per 100,000.</p> <p>Access to and quality of health services increased steadily throughout Ukraine's post-Soviet transition. The current maternal mortality rate places Ukraine at the bottom end of all countries in and around Europe, and roughly on par with the United States.</p> <p>According to estimates from the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere, roughly four percent of displaced people will be pregnant women, and 15% of those women will require emergency obstetric interventions.</p> <p>Applying that number to the current 2 million refugees who have left Ukraine, and estimating roughly another 1 million internally displaced persons based on pre-war reports, that would mean there are currently around 120,000 displaced pregnant women in and around Ukraine, with about 18,000 in need of emergency obstetric interventions.</p> <p>During the conflict, however, women are disproportionately at risk of being cut off to all aspects of quality maternal health throughout the entire cycle of care. On the most extreme level, women who were in the late stages of their pregnancies when the war in Ukraine started are now giving birth while displaced. Some <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/ukraine-war-russia-pregnant-women-birth-shelter-b2028865.html">have even given birth in bomb shelters</a>, where they may lack not only skilled birth attendance but even the basic supplies required to give birth safely.</p> <p>It’s important to remember that many women in Ukraine, particularly those in eastern separatist areas, have been facing the consequences of conflict-related disruptions since 2019. The World Health Organization recommended prioritization for women in these situations as follows:</p> <ul><li> <p>Improving access to reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health services for internally displaced persons and in the eastern regions affected by the crisis;</p> </li> <li> <p>Increasing the capacity of health care providers working in Mobile Emergency Primary Units by updating and organizing trainings with the inclusion of maternal and child health modules; and</p> </li> <li> <p>Strengthening services in emergency triage assessment and treatment of children.</p> </li> </ul><p>These recommendations continue to apply in the current situation and should expand in scope relative to the size of the conflict-affected population.</p> <p>Likewise, conflict tends to sharply reduce access to sexual and reproductive health services, while increasing women's exposure to gender-based violence.</p> <h2>Gender-Based Violence</h2> <p>According to a 2019 study by UNFPA, <a href="https://eeca.unfpa.org/en/publications/well-being-and-safety-women?_ga=2.8081201.220554671.1646062129-58387694.1642436549">roughly 75% of Ukrainian women reported having experienced some form of violence prior to age 15, with 30% reporting direct physical or sexual violence</a>.</p> <p>During situations of conflict and displacement, the risk of gender-based violence tends to increase dramatically. According to a 2020 Amnesty International report, <a href="https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2020/11/ukraine-epidemic-of-violence-against-women-in-conflicttorn-east/">Ukraine saw a severe increase in reports of domestic violence in separatist areas in 2018: 76% in the eastern region of Donetsk and 158% in Luhansk</a>. These types of statistics are quite common in wartime situations, with reports of general violence against women, including rape and other forms of sexual abuse, increasing significantly.</p> <p>Likewise, reports by <a href="https://www.unwomen.org/en/news-stories/op-ed/2022/03/op-ed-what-does-the-military-offensive-in-ukraine-mean-for-women-and-girls">UN Women</a>, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, and others prioritize a focus on the human trafficking of women and girls, specifically as a result of forced displacement. This is because people tend to end up in difficult and insecure living situations over long periods of time due to conflict.</p> <p>Ukraine is, of course, not unusual - every conflict sees these trends of disproportionate exposure to risks for women and girls. But because of the scale of the Ukraine crisis, which has already displaced millions, it is essential to prioritize gender as a lens through which to view the health impacts of the war.</p> <h2><a href="https://www.directrelief.org/emergency/ukraine-crisis/">Ukraine Relief</a></h2> <p>Direct Relief is working with Ukraine's Ministry of Health and other groups in the region to provide requested medical aid, from oxygen concentrators to critical care medicines - while preparing to offer longer-term aid to people displaced or affected by the war. To date, Direct Relief has deployed more than 25 tons of requested medical aid to Ukraine. </p></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="block block- block-field-blocknodeblogfield-blog-type"> <div class="block-content"> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-type field--type-entity-reference field--label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field__label">Blog Type</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/43" hreflang="en">Funder Op-Ed</a></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 10 Mar 2022 22:06:25 +0000 Eddy Gonzalez 1151 at https://socalgrantmakers.org